David Gardiner & Associates 045-853726

 

Foam rolling or self myofascial release is a useful tool to self manage any tight muscle pre or post running/walking or even as a maintenance session on your rest day/day off. Self myofascial release is a fancy term for self massage to release muscle tightness or trigger points.

 

Trigger points are specific “knots” that form in muscles. There can be identified by their ability to refer pain. Pain referral can be easily described as the pain felt when the pressure is applied to one area of the body but can be felt in another area. For example when you foam roll your IT band, pain can commonly be felt in the hip and or ankle region. The pain you get should be uncomfortable, but not unbearable, a bit like when you stretch. After foam rolling the muscles you worked on should feel better.

 

Muscle tightness and trigger points can occur for numerous reasons, contributing factors can include training, flexibility, posture, stress, nutrition, hydration and rest. Our bodies are very clever and learn to compensate for how we move, or don’t move, on a daily basis. However sometimes we can exceed our bodies ability to recover with over training, poor posture and poor nutrition and hydration.

 

Self myofascial release or foam rolling allows normal blood flow to return to the muscles affected. You may feel sore the following day after foam rolling, remember to drink plenty of water, sleep for at least 8 hours at night and eat clean. Give 24-48 hours before focusing on the same area again.

 

See below some techniques for foam rolling, why not print out the images below to try it out yourself. Or if you’re unsure or need some further assistance why not give the clinic a call and one of our physiotherapists would be more than happy to make a personalised foam rolling programme for you. Book an appointment that suits you @ http://physiotherapyworks.ie/book-online/ or call us on 045-866075

 

 

Happy rolling!

 

Quads

Begin by lying across the Roller, elbows and forearms planted firmly on the ground. Gently pull with elbows and forearms to roll and release the quadriceps muscle. Control the pressure through controlling the amount of weight on the Roller. Make sure to keep abdominal muscles tight and back straight. To increase the release of the right quadriceps muscle, slowly stack left leg on top of right leg. Continue rolling with long sweeping strokes, working shorter repetitive strokes in areas of increased tightness.

quad-foam-roller

 

 

 

Hip Flexor
Begin by lying across the Roller, elbows and forearms planted firmly on the ground. To isolate and control the release of the right hip flexor muscle, scoot to the far edge of the Roller to place left foot and knee on the floor. Gently pull with elbows and forearms to roll back and forth with small strokes in the right groin region, slightly shifting body weight right and left to target a specific region. Allow the left leg to assist in controlling and focusing the pressure on the right hip flexor. Slowly return to neutral.

 

hip-flexor-roller

 

 

 

Hamstrings

Begin by sitting on the floor behind the Roller, both thighs draped across the Roller. Keeping hands planted on the floor, lift buttocks up to roll back and forth along the length of the hamstring muscles. To increase the release of the right hamstring muscle, slowly stack left leg on top of right leg. Continue rolling with long sweeping strokes, working shorter repetitive strokes in areas of increased tightness.

hamstring-roller

 

 

 

Piriformis

Begin by sitting on the Roller, both hands and heels planted firmly on the ground. To target the deeper piriformis muscle, place the ankle of that leg across the opposite knee. Gently roll body weight back and forth across the Roller – following the path of the muscle being massaged. To increase the release of the piriformis muscle, reach across body to hold crossed knee with opposite hand. Lean in toward that side of the buttocks while gradually pulling knee toward opposite shoulder into a piriformis stretch position. Continue rolling. Slowly return to neutral.

piriformis-roller

 

 

 

 

Calves

Begin by sitting on the floor behind the Roller, both calves draped across the Roller. Keeping hands planted on the floor, lift buttocks up to roll back and forth along the length of the gastrocnemius-soleus complex. Control the pressure through controlling the amount of weight on the Roller. Slowly return to neutral.

calf-roller

 

 

 

 

 

IT Band

 

Begin in a side-lying position across the Roller with bottom elbow, forearm and top hand & foot all planted firmly on the ground. Gently roll body weight back and forth across the Roller – following the path of the muscle and tissue being massaged. While pushing and stabilizing with top hand and foot, pull with bottom elbow and forearm to roll and release the length of the IT Band. Make sure to keep abdominal muscles tight and body in straight alignment. Control the pressure through controlling the amount of weight on the Roller.

it-band-roller-1

 

 

 

We recommend you spend up to a minute focusing on a muscle group, if you feel particularly tight in a specific muscle group spend a little longer.

If you would like to talk to a chartered physiotherapist about a more specific program please use the link to book on-line http://physiotherapyworks.ie/book-online/ or call us on 045-866075